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جمعه 2 اردیبهشت‌ماه سال 1390 ساعت 06:38 ب.ظ

how to write a resume



Knowing how to write a resume is a critical skill for surviving and thriving in today's job market. Your resume is the first impression you give to a potential employer. It can help you land an interview or may lead to new job opportunities. Whether you are actively seeking a new job, or just want to refresh your existing resume, this page will guide you through the step needed to make your resume stand out from the crowd.

Whether you want to advance in your chosen field or you're making a drastic career change, a resume is a job search necessity. It provides an overview of your experience and skills, and a great resume can help you make it passed the screening cut and on to the interview round for a new job. Spending the time to perfect your resume is an investment in your future.

Resumes can be formatted in different ways, but it must accurately reflect your qualifications and job experiences. Generally, resumes should be kept to around one page, as information over a page is often ignored. Consider creating a standard resume that you can tweak according to the job descriptions regarding jobs you would like to obtain. Customization can help you land a job because you demonstration that you are a "good fit" for the business and position


.

How to Write a Resume


This video is hosted by Brad Bucklin of CareerPro Resumes and Video Symphony. He advises in the video on how to write a resume. He reviews each resume section in detail including contact information, objective statement, qualifications, job history, education, and achievements This is part of a wider series on Mahalo about interviews, resumes and employment


How-to Guides: Resume and Cover Letter

 -   Be Honest
   1     It is better to address any gaps in employment than to try to hide them.
   2     Lying on your resume may get you into an interview, but you still have to go through a background and reference check to land the job.
   3     If you state you can perform a task or operate a program you don't know, your lie eventually be exposed.

 -   Be Professional
   1     If your email address is funny but unprofessional, it may turn off potential employers.
    2    If necessary, create a new email address solely for resumes (and don't forget to check it for responses!).

 -   Be Concise
    1    Write out everything you want to include on your resume. You can trim it down to one page later.
            Note: If you have over 10 years of work experience, that is important and needs to be included, a resume of two pages is acceptable.
     2   Use easy-to-read fonts and a clear design] to make your resume more appealing
Step 1: Before You Write Your Resume
    Before you begin constructing a resume, take the time to think about your experience and what type of job you're looking for.
        If you're re-entering the workforce, you may pick a different format than someone who's been working continuously.
        A recent college graduate will focus more on educational background than an experienced worker.
        If you're changing careers, you may opt for a different format than someone who is remaining in his current field.
    Take a look at some sample resumes online. Boston College, the Wall Street Journal, Vault.com, and the University of Florida have some good examples.

Do Research in Your Industry

    The type of job you're applying for will should influence the type of resume you write.
    Determine if there's a style of resume often used in your desired field, consider using it yourself.
    Look at sample resumes from other people in your industry. Is there a section or format they're using? You might want to include it too!



Source:http://www.mahalo.com


Step 2: Use these Resume Writing Tips

    Be Honest
        It is better to address any gaps in employment than to try to hide them.
        Lying on your resume may get you into an interview, but you still have to go through a background and reference check to land the job.
        If you state you can perform a task or operate a program you don't know, your lie eventually be exposed.

    Be Professional
        If your email address is funny but unprofessional, it may turn off potential employers.8
        If necessary, create a new email address solely for resumes (and don't forget to check it for responses!).

    Be Concise
        Write out everything you want to include on your resume. You can trim it down to one page later.
            Note: If you have over 10 years of work experience, that is important and needs to be included, a resume of two pages is acceptable.
        Use easy-to-read fonts and a clear design] to make your resume more appealing.



Step 3: Write Your Resume's Objective Statement

    An objective statement is the first thing listed after your personal information.
    The objective statement is a sentence or two that sums up your current career goals.
    An objective statement is not always a resume necessity, but it can be a beneficial summary of what you're looking for in a position.
    If you're starting your resume from scratch, write your objective statement first. This can help you decide what information to highlight on your resume, even if you ultimately decide not to include an objective statement.
    Do not write a generic objective statement as it is likely to turn off a prospective employer.
        Example: My goal is to get a rewarding job that pays well.
    Your objective statement should relate to the job for which you are applying.
        Example: An experienced public relations consultant, I now seek a position as an account manager where I can utilize my management skills.
    Target your statement to the position. This is the first information on the page after your name and address, and it should make the case for you being the perfect person for the job!

Step 4: Choose a Resume Style

    There are several types of resumes:
        Chronological
        Skills
        Functional
        Combination
       
    You want to think about your situation and create the best resume for your experience and desired job.
    Most recruiters want your resume to show your career progression.
 Therefore, chronological or combination resumes (resumes that list your work history in chronological order, starting with your most recent job) are the most common types.
    If you have no work history or have worked multiple jobs over a short period of time, an unconventional format may present your talents and abilities in a better light.
    Pick the the type of resume that is best suited to your work history and your goals.
    If you're unsure what type fits best, try writing your resume in two or more formats, then ask for feedback from friends or relatives. An objective eye may tell you which format is best for you!
    Most resumes should fit on one page. However, if the information is truly important and necessary, two pages is acceptable.
        If you have less than 10 years' work experience, you should only need a one page resume.
        It is better to go onto a second page than to leave out important information.
        Do not go onto a second page for unimportant information, like personal hobbies, out-of-date skills and achievements from over 10 years ago.
Chronological Resumes

    This is the most common type of resume.
    It lists your work and educational history in reverse chronological order.
    The general layout is as follows:
        Header with personal information (Name, Address, Phone numbers, Email).
        Objective statement (if included).
        Career and skills summary (if included).
        Reverse chronological career listings (include employer names and locations).
        Educational background (School name, location and your GPA).
            -Recent graduates may place education ahead of their career listings.
    List what you achieved in different positions, not what your job responsibilities were.
    Quantify your on-the-job accomplishments.
        Instead of writing that you improved customer relations, state that customer satisfaction increased 40% while you were in charge.
        Explain the size of the company you worked for, the number of people you supervised, and the size of any budgets you managed.
    Condense unimportant information. There is no need to list every job you've had since college. You can include a quick summary of those early positions in a section labeled "early career."
        If you were recognized or honored for work you accomplished, include it if it is relevant to the job you want to obtain.
    If you've been in the workforce for several years, your educational background becomes less important. Trimming this section to the basics will leave more room for more recent information.
Skills Resumes

    Skills resumes allow you to group your work history by skills, not by dates or places of employment.
    This form of resume allows you to highlight the skills you think are most important as you can present your most relevant experience first, rather than your most recent position.
    This resume style can be particularly useful for someone who is re-entering the workforce, or entering the workforce for the first time, and does not have recent work experience.
    It is also well-suited for career changes, as you can list skills relevant to the job you want to obtain.
    Write a clear objective statement that ties your skills to the job you seek.
    Include a career summary that explains why you are changing careers or re-entering the workforce.
    The general layout is as follows:
        Header with personal information (Name, Address, Phone numbers, Email).
        Objective statement.
        Career summary.
        Skills groupings.
        List of places of employment (include employer names, locations, and dates of employment).
        Educational background (School name, location and your GPA).
            (Recent graduates may place education ahead of their skill groupings).



Knowing how to write a resume is a critical skill for surviving and thriving in today's job market. Your resume is the first impression you give to a potential employer. It can help you land an interview or may lead to new job opportunities. Whether you are actively seeking a new job, or just want to refresh your existing resume, this page will guide you through the step needed to make your resume stand out from the crowd.

Whether you want to advance in your chosen field or you're making a drastic career change, a resume is a job search necessity. It provides an overview of your experience and skills, and a great resume can help you make it passed the screening cut and on to the interview round for a new job. Spending the time to perfect your resume is an investment in your future.

Resumes can be formatted in different ways, but it must accurately reflect your qualifications and job experiences. Generally, resumes should be kept to around one page, as information over a page is often ignored. Consider creating a standard resume that you can tweak according to the job descriptions regarding jobs you would like to obtain. Customization can help you land a job because you demonstration that you are a "good fit" for the business and position


.

How to Write a Resume


This video is hosted by Brad Bucklin of CareerPro Resumes and Video Symphony. He advises in the video on how to write a resume. He reviews each resume section in detail including contact information, objective statement, qualifications, job history, education, and achievements This is part of a wider series on Mahalo about interviews, resumes and employment


How-to Guides: Resume and Cover Letter

 -   Be Honest
   1     It is better to address any gaps in employment than to try to hide them.
   2     Lying on your resume may get you into an interview, but you still have to go through a background and reference check to land the job.
   3     If you state you can perform a task or operate a program you don't know, your lie eventually be exposed.

 -   Be Professional
   1     If your email address is funny but unprofessional, it may turn off potential employers.
    2    If necessary, create a new email address solely for resumes (and don't forget to check it for responses!).

 -   Be Concise
    1    Write out everything you want to include on your resume. You can trim it down to one page later.
            Note: If you have over 10 years of work experience, that is important and needs to be included, a resume of two pages is acceptable.
     2   Use easy-to-read fonts and a clear design] to make your resume more appealing
Step 1: Before You Write Your Resume
    Before you begin constructing a resume, take the time to think about your experience and what type of job you're looking for.
        If you're re-entering the workforce, you may pick a different format than someone who's been working continuously.
        A recent college graduate will focus more on educational background than an experienced worker.
        If you're changing careers, you may opt for a different format than someone who is remaining in his current field.
    Take a look at some sample resumes online. Boston College, the Wall Street Journal, Vault.com, and the University of Florida have some good examples.

Do Research in Your Industry

    The type of job you're applying for will should influence the type of resume you write.
    Determine if there's a style of resume often used in your desired field, consider using it yourself.
    Look at sample resumes from other people in your industry. Is there a section or format they're using? You might want to include it too!



Source:http://www.mahalo.com


Step 2: Use these Resume Writing Tips

    Be Honest
        It is better to address any gaps in employment than to try to hide them.
        Lying on your resume may get you into an interview, but you still have to go through a background and reference check to land the job.
        If you state you can perform a task or operate a program you don't know, your lie eventually be exposed.

    Be Professional
        If your email address is funny but unprofessional, it may turn off potential employers.8
        If necessary, create a new email address solely for resumes (and don't forget to check it for responses!).

    Be Concise
        Write out everything you want to include on your resume. You can trim it down to one page later.
            Note: If you have over 10 years of work experience, that is important and needs to be included, a resume of two pages is acceptable.
        Use easy-to-read fonts and a clear design] to make your resume more appealing.



Step 3: Write Your Resume's Objective Statement

    An objective statement is the first thing listed after your personal information.
    The objective statement is a sentence or two that sums up your current career goals.
    An objective statement is not always a resume necessity, but it can be a beneficial summary of what you're looking for in a position.
    If you're starting your resume from scratch, write your objective statement first. This can help you decide what information to highlight on your resume, even if you ultimately decide not to include an objective statement.
    Do not write a generic objective statement as it is likely to turn off a prospective employer.
        Example: My goal is to get a rewarding job that pays well.
    Your objective statement should relate to the job for which you are applying.
        Example: An experienced public relations consultant, I now seek a position as an account manager where I can utilize my management skills.
    Target your statement to the position. This is the first information on the page after your name and address, and it should make the case for you being the perfect person for the job!

Step 4: Choose a Resume Style

    There are several types of resumes:
        Chronological
        Skills
        Functional
        Combination
       
    You want to think about your situation and create the best resume for your experience and desired job.
    Most recruiters want your resume to show your career progression.
 Therefore, chronological or combination resumes (resumes that list your work history in chronological order, starting with your most recent job) are the most common types.
    If you have no work history or have worked multiple jobs over a short period of time, an unconventional format may present your talents and abilities in a better light.
    Pick the the type of resume that is best suited to your work history and your goals.
    If you're unsure what type fits best, try writing your resume in two or more formats, then ask for feedback from friends or relatives. An objective eye may tell you which format is best for you!
    Most resumes should fit on one page. However, if the information is truly important and necessary, two pages is acceptable.
        If you have less than 10 years' work experience, you should only need a one page resume.
        It is better to go onto a second page than to leave out important information.
        Do not go onto a second page for unimportant information, like personal hobbies, out-of-date skills and achievements from over 10 years ago.
Chronological Resumes

    This is the most common type of resume.
    It lists your work and educational history in reverse chronological order.
    The general layout is as follows:
        Header with personal information (Name, Address, Phone numbers, Email).
        Objective statement (if included).
        Career and skills summary (if included).
        Reverse chronological career listings (include employer names and locations).
        Educational background (School name, location and your GPA).
            -Recent graduates may place education ahead of their career listings.
    List what you achieved in different positions, not what your job responsibilities were.
    Quantify your on-the-job accomplishments.
        Instead of writing that you improved customer relations, state that customer satisfaction increased 40% while you were in charge.
        Explain the size of the company you worked for, the number of people you supervised, and the size of any budgets you managed.
    Condense unimportant information. There is no need to list every job you've had since college. You can include a quick summary of those early positions in a section labeled "early career."
        If you were recognized or honored for work you accomplished, include it if it is relevant to the job you want to obtain.
    If you've been in the workforce for several years, your educational background becomes less important. Trimming this section to the basics will leave more room for more recent information.
Skills Resumes

    Skills resumes allow you to group your work history by skills, not by dates or places of employment.
    This form of resume allows you to highlight the skills you think are most important as you can present your most relevant experience first, rather than your most recent position.
    This resume style can be particularly useful for someone who is re-entering the workforce, or entering the workforce for the first time, and does not have recent work experience.
    It is also well-suited for career changes, as you can list skills relevant to the job you want to obtain.
    Write a clear objective statement that ties your skills to the job you seek.
    Include a career summary that explains why you are changing careers or re-entering the workforce.
    The general layout is as follows:
        Header with personal information (Name, Address, Phone numbers, Email).
        Objective statement.
        Career summary.
        Skills groupings.
        List of places of employment (include employer names, locations, and dates of employment).
        Educational background (School name, location and your GPA).
            (Recent graduates may place education ahead of their skill groupings).